Cranberry Cornbread

I feel like it’s pretty needless to say that I love Thanksgiving.

I’ll say it anyways.

I Love Thanksgiving.

 Thanksgiving is like the official gateway to the holiday season. So much food, family, friends, fun, festivity, fires, frivolity….I can’t think of anymore pleasant f-words at the moment. Fiddlesticks. There’s a good one.

So, from me to you, here’s my first holiday recipe of the season.

I love being seasonal. I love it almost as much as I love cornbread.

Cranberries are such beacons of commercial holiday joy. Like the second after Halloween is over, the holiday gods just smite down anything with a pumpkin and spit cranberries everywhere. Throw a handful of cranberries on anything and you’re suddenly in the holiday spirit. It’s like magic.

I learned something else very important about cranberries through this cornbread encounter…I will never like them as edible beings.

I don’t care how many antioxidants they have or how much your kidneys love ’em, cranberries are nasty. I want them to be sweet, but they’re not and I am not cool with their ambivalent bitterness.

Bad attitude berries…that’s what they should be called.

In all fairness though, their juicy tartness does lend quite well to sweet crumbly cornbread.

 I was inspired by one of my dear life-long comrades telling me about a life-changing blueberry cornbread their pal’s dad makes.

Sounded off the chain to me.

I needed a non-dessert item for the newspaper staff Thanksgiving potluck… I love cornbread… Cornbread is Thanksgiving-like…  Cranberries scream holiday festivity… This is an extremely accurate replication of my thought processes.

 And maybe I wanted to be a little bit of a cheater and do something easy-cheesy that could be made ahead of time and frozen.

Don’t judge me. My being a cheater doesn’t make my cornbread any less delish or festive. And I’m willing to bet my right foot that at some point this holiday season you’re gonna need to be a little bit of a cheater mcbeaver too, so be grateful I’m doing it early on and paving a path. It’ll look more acceptable when you do it.

Anyway, forreals, super simple stuff. Start with dry stuff…

 Mix in wet junk…

Toss in the holiday charm.

Bippity boppity boo. You’re ready to rock. 

Aside from super simple bread fulfillment and finally coming to terms with my disdain for cranberries, yet another momentous accomplishment came out the  oven with these pans of cranberry cornbread… 

 I have finally arrived at my absolute stand-by, fail-proof, perfectly perfect cornbread recipe.

I’m fully aware that I’ve said it multiple times already, but I seriously love cornbread. Seriously. I could eat it anytime, anywhere, any place. As long as it’s good. Good to me means dense and crumbly, yet still moist, and slightly sweet.  You can keep your spicy, cheesy, psycho cornbread.

A legitimately good cornbread recipe…is a big fat deal. Treasure it when you find the one that’s perfect to you. Print it on golden paper and pass it to your descendants.

That’s my kind of golden inheritance.

Cranberry Cornbread

  • 3/4 cup fresh cranberries, rinsed and halved
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil

Preheat oven to 400F. Grease an 8 or 9 inch square baking pan.

In a large mixing bowl, sift together flour, cornmeal, sugar, salt, and baking powder. Stir in buttermilk, egg, and oil. Fold in cranberry halves.

Pour into prepared pan and bake 20-25 minutes or until golden brown.

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4 thoughts on “Cranberry Cornbread

  1. have you ever tried craisins? if you like raisins, you’d like them… they’re made the same way as raisins but with cranberries instead of grapes. i generally don’t like cranberries, but i like craisins very much, AND they’re healthy, AND, i’ve heard, great to bake with. just sayin’.

    • Actually yes, I am quite a fan of craisins! and they are quite delish in baking, theyre actually sweet & nummy & don’t have that bitter aftertaste…I consider them a horse of a different color from their plump bitter parents.

  2. Pingback: Cornbread Bites « Beauty & the Feast

  3. Pingback: White Bean Chicken Chili « Beauty & the Feast

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