Bourbon Peach Cobbler with No-Churn Vanilla Ice Cream

Straight up, we’re talking about how much I love peaches, bourbon, biscuit-like toppings and ridiculously simple ice cream recipes.

Because focusing on peach cobbler with vanilla ice cream is keeping a smile on my face right now. Can’t promise it’d be there otherwise.

This post has changed content two too many times.

I started out by delving into the concept of knowing thyself.

It was verging on deep. I liked it. But WordPress apparently did not. I say this because for whatever reason, clicking the happy little “Save Draft” button resulted in a clean page staring back at my dumbstruck face.

Bummer dude.

Guess who was not about to rewrite that mess. I’m already well behind on my posting schedule, like dagum. I’ll gladly give share the backbone of this post that could have been, though. It stemmed from a quote that stuck with me after a lecture by the magnificent Nathalie Dupree

The hardest thing in life is to know what you know and what you don’t know anyway.
Yeah, that was pretty much the important part. Do with it what you will.

So then, after spending my morning writing out this heartfelt blog post, (kinda)wittily tied to bubbly warm cobbler, and having it inexplicably erased… I was mildly agitated.

No lies, I bout lost my cool. There would have been profanity and hate everywhere. Wouldn’t have been perdy.

I was majorly miffed over wasting time, losing what I’d written and having to face you guys with yet another pathetic excuse as to why my technological mediocrity is preventing me from saying what I want to say to you. I mean come on, that’s weak. I swear, if it happens again, boycott Beauty and the Feast. I don’t deserve you. Never come back. I mean it.    No I don’t.  So torn.

Thankfully, being a big girl with a job prevented me from ever verbalizing those angry sentiments. Which is most definitely for the best. Peaches and cream and bourbon shouldn’t be defiled with profanity and hate. Lord, no.

I’d be a downright disgusting member of the human populace if I were to ever pull such a stunt.

So here we are void of any contemplations on self and without fowl language. Nope, none of that. We’re here abound only with love for summer sweetness.

And lies I guess. We have some of those too. More like I do.

I certainly lied. I said there would be no discussion of anything but boozy peaches and ice cream you ain’t gotta stir. That didn’t happen. At all. Obviously. Sorry.

A filthy scoundrel I am. Full of nothing but excuses and deceit. Cast downward glances my way. But not at my cobbler.

I think we all have the idea now… I very much dig juicy Georgia peaches, particularly when baked in sugar and man liquor. And of course, sweet drunken peaches tend to be all the better when resting under big buttery biscuits. As are most things.

As if this warm  and gooey love-fest weren’t scrumptious enough, we gotta go finishing with the cream on top. Had to. It was too easy not to.

 I mean, ice cream under any circumstance is good. But homemade ice cream… homemade ice cream that you stir up in ten minutes and don’t give another thought to until it’s frozen and awaiting you in a Tupperware, that’s real good. Right??

Don’t let guilt stop you from taking advantage of something so easy. Easy can be delicious and morally acceptable every now and again. Just do it.

And with that, allow me to apologize one last time for being a low-life, filthy scoundrel. I’ll have my act together soon. Mercy me, let us hope so.

Bourbon Peach Cobbler

Adapted from Tyler Florence

  • 8 peaches, peeled and sliced (6 to 8 cups)
  • 1/4 cup bourbon
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar, plus more for sprinkling
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 sticks cold unsalted butter
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream, plus more for brushing

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Combine the peaches, bourbon, brown sugar, the cornstarch and cinnamon in a large bowl and toss to coat.

Sift the flour, the 1/2 cup granulated sugar, the baking powder and salt into a bowl. Cut 1 1/2 sticks of the butter into small pieces; add to the flour mixture and cut it in with a pastry blender or your hands until the mixture looks like coarse crumbs. Pour in the cream and mix just until the dough comes together. Don’t overwork; the dough should be slightly sticky but manageable.

Melt the remaining 1/2 stick butter in a 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium-low heat. Add the peach mixture and cook gently until heated through, about 5 minutes. Transfer the mixture to a 2-quart baking dish (or leave in the skillet). Drop the dough by tablespoonfuls over the warm peaches. (There can be gaps because the dough will puff up and spread as it bakes.) Brush the top with some heavy cream and sprinkle with sugar and a little extra cinnamon.

Bake in the oven on a baking sheet (to catch any drips) until the cobbler is browned and the fruit is bubbling, 40 to 45 minutes. Serve warm with a scoop of vanilla ice cream on top.

No-Churn Vanilla Ice Cream

From Martha Stewart

  • 1 can (14 ounces) sweetened condensed milk
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons bourbon
  • 2 cups cold heavy cream

In a medium bowl, stir together condensed milk, vanilla, and Bourbon, if desired. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat cream on high until stiff peaks form, 3 minutes. With a rubber spatula, gently fold whipped cream into condensed milk mixture. Pour into a 4 1/2-by-8 1/2-inch loaf pan. Freeze until firm, 6 hours

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